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History

History

The study of history helps pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It inspires pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Aims

The history curriculum aims to ensure that all pupils:  

  • Know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world  

  • Know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind  

  • Gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’  

  • Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses  

  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed  

  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. 

At Key Stage 3, students extend and deepen their chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, so that it provides a well-informed context for wider learning. Pupils identify significant events, make connections, draw contrasts, and analyse trends within periods and over long arcs of time. They are taught to use historical terms and concepts in increasingly sophisticated ways. They pursue historically valid enquiries and create relevant, structured and evidentially supported accounts in response. They learn to understand how different types of historical sources are used rigorously to make historical claims and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed. 

At Key Stage 4, students learn more about the history of Britain and that of the wider world. The study of history at GCSE inspires students to deepen their understanding of the people, periods and events studied and enable them to think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, make informed decisions and develop perspective and judgement. This, in turn, prepares them for a role as informed, thoughtful and active citizens. The discipline of history and a knowledge and understanding of the past also helps them to understand their own identity and significant aspects of the world in which they live, and provides them with the basis for further wider learning and study 

HISTORY CURRICULUM INFORMATION FOR YEARS 7-11 

Year 

Term 

Units of Work 

Assessments 

 7 

Autumn 

The Norman Conquest / Castles and Local Study 

GCSE style exam on Normans & Castles 

  

Spring 

Britain: Health and the Nation / The Reformation and Counter-Reformation 

GCSE style exam on Normans, Castles & Britain: Health and the Nation 

  

Summer 

The English Civil War / The Industrial Revolution 

 

GCSE style exam paper covering all topics in Y7. 

 8 

Autumn 

 The Transatlantic Slave Trade / World War One 

GCSE style exam on Slave Trade 

GCSE style exam on Slave Trade & World War One 

  

Spring 

Inter-war Years / World War Two 

GCSE style exam on Slavery, WWI, Inter-war years &WWII 

  

Summer 

The Holocaust / Impact of WWII – Britain and USA 

GCSE style exam paper covering all topics in Y8 

 9 

Autumn 

Weimar Germany 

Mini GCSE exam 

  

Spring 

Weimar and Nazi Germany 

Mini GCSE exam 

  

Summer 

Crime and Punishment 

Exam Paper – full section of exam paper on Weimar and Nazi Germany 

Mini GCSE exam on Crime and Punishment 

 10 

Autumn 

Crime and Punishment / White Chapel 

Mini GCSE exam 

GCSE exam on Weimar Germany and Crime and Punishment 

  

Spring 

Whitechapel / The American West 

Mini GCSE exam 

  

Summer 

The American West 

Exam paper – full section of exam paper on Elizabeth 

 11 

Autumn 

Elizabeth I 

Mock Exams 

  

Spring 

REVISION 

Mock Exams 

GCSE COURSE INFORMATION 

Qualification & Board 

GCSE History - Edexcel  

Course Content (for A level, how this follows on from GCSE) 

Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment 

Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000–present and Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city. 

Paper 2: Period study and British depth study 

Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88. 

And 

The American West, c1835–c1895 

Paper 3: Modern depth study 

Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918–39 

 

Potential Career paths 

History is a highly respected subject in further education, not only because of the knowledge you learn, but more importantly the skills you develop and apply throughout the course e.g. Critical thinking, making a judgement, collaboration and independent working skills as well as the ability to understand and respect conflicting viewpoints. You will use and develop these skills in a variety of ways including independent and group research, debates and analysis of interpretations and historical sources. All these are important and transferable skills that can be utilised in various careers such as;  

Secondary school teacher, Heritage manager, Museum education officer, Archaeologist, Archivist, Solicitor, Civil Service, Media, Politics, Law, Business and Finance, Editor, Research and news broadcasting, Journalist 

 

Assessments (inc. field work / assessed practicals) 

Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment 

  • Written examination: 1 hour and 15 minutes 

  • 30%* of the qualification 

  • 52 marks (16 for the historic environment, 36 for the thematic study) 

Paper 2: Period study and British depth study 

  • Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes 

  • 40%* of the qualification 

  • 64 marks (32 for the period study and 32 for the British depth study) 

Paper 3: Modern depth study 

Written examination: 1 hour and 20 minutes 

30% of the qualification 

52 marks 

Throughout teaching of GCSE; 

  • Regular exam questions to be completed throughout the course (in class and homework). 

  • End of topic exams (section of paper) completed at end of each topic. 

  • Regular mini assessments practicing all exam question types for section of GCSE paper. 

  •  

Core or Option 

  OPTION 

No Option Choices (GCSE only) 

  

No. GCSE / A Level equivalent 

 1 GCSE