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Film

Film studies - A level

What will I learn?

A level film studies encourages learners to examine films critically and analytically, developing their understating of what makes ‘great’ film and recognising how past masters have helped shape this progressive medium. It is both a practical and creative course so you will have the opportunity to consider the cultural and artistic impact of important works, whilst using this knowledge to help you inform your own productions.

If you consider yourself a creative thinker and are interested in film analysis and film creation, then this is the course for you!

What skills do I need?

People who excel on this course have a real enthusiasm for film. They are motivated to understand what techniques make film such a unique form of expression and enjoy examining the meanings behind the texts. Students who have been successful in English are likely to do well, but it is also important that you are prepared to use your understanding to create your own texts (either as screenplays or as fully completed film extracts).

How is the course graded?

Component One: American Film. This component assesses knowledge and understanding of three American films.

Section A: Hollywood since the 1960s (two-film study) - one two-part question, requiring reference to two Hollywood films, one produced between 1961 and 1990 and the other more recent.

Section B: Contemporary American independent film. One two-part question, requiring reference to one contemporary American independent film (produced after 2010).

Component Two: European Film. This component assesses knowledge and understanding of two British films (a comparative study) and one non-English language European film.

Section A: British film (comparative study) - one two-part question, requiring reference to a pair of British films, one produced between 1930 and 1960 and the other more recent.

Section B: Non-English language European film - one two-part question, requiring reference to one non-English language European film.

Component Three: Film Production. This component assesses one production and its accompanying evaluative analysis.

Production. Either an extract from a film highlighting narrative construction (2½ to 3½ minutes) Or a screenplay for an extract from a film highlighting narrative construction of between 1200 and 1400 words plus a digitally photographed storyboard of a key section from the screenplay.

Evaluative analysis - An evaluative analysis (1000-1250 words) of the production in comparison with other professionally produced films or screenplays.

What is next for me after this course?

The course can open up doors in journalism, TV production, advertising, public relations, publishing and film production.

FILM CURRICULUM INFORMATION FOR YEARS 12-13

Year

Term

Units of Work

Assessments

 12 Film

Autumn

  • Introduction to Film Studies
  • Introduction to micro / macro features of film.
  • Trainspotting - Core Study Areas: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film Specialist Study Area: Narrative
  • Vertigo - Core Study Areas: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film Specialist Study Area: Context
  • Introduction to screenplays

 Assessments week 4, 8, 12.

 

Spring

  • Blade Runner - Core Study Areas: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film Specialist Study Area: Context
  • This is England - Core Study Areas: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film Specialist Study Area: Narrative

Cold assessment Paper 1: wk 18

Cold assessment  Paper 2 section B

Progress exams week 28

 

Summer

  • Life is Beautiful - Core Study Areas Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film
  • Boyhood - Core Study Areas Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film
  • Vertigo Revision
  • Blade Runner Revision

Continuous assessment via NEA

 13 Film

Autumn

  • No Country for Old Men
  • Core Study Areas: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film Specialist Study Area: Spectatorship
  • Boyhood – revision
  • Wild Tales - Core Study Areas: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film

 Second draft of NEA screenplay to be submitted:  week 1; draft 1; draft 2 - week 7 (17th October).

Cold assessment No Country for Old Men and Boyhood

Progress exams week 9: Paper 1.

 

Spring

  • The Arbour - Core Study Areas: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film Specialist Study Area: Critical Debates Filmmakers’ Theories
  • Trainspotting Revision / This is England Revision
  • Sunrise - Core Study Areas: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film Specialist Study Area: Critical Debates
  • Life is Beautiful Revision
  • Pulp Fiction - Core Study Area: Key Elements of Film Form Meaning & Response The Contexts of Film Specialist Study Area: Narrative (AL) Auteur
  • All film revision

Cold assessment  Paper 2

Cold assessment Paper 1: wk 18

 NEA Screenplay –Draft 3 week 16 (7th Jan); draft 4 (final) week 21 (11th Feb).

Cold assessment every 2 weeks

A LEVEL COURSE INFORMATION

Qualification & Board

WJEC Eduqas GCE A LEVEL in FILM STUDIES CODE?

Course Content (for A level, how this follows on from GCSE)

Film is one of the main cultural innovations of the 20th century and a major art form of the last hundred years. Those who study it characteristically bring with them a high degree of enthusiasm and excitement for what is a powerful and culturally significant medium, inspiring a range of responses from the emotional to the reflective. Film Studies consequently makes an important contribution to the curriculum, offering the opportunity to investigate how film works both as a medium of representation and as an aesthetic medium.

Potential Career paths

Teaching, journalism, advertising, copy writing, filmmaking

Assessments (inc. field work / assessed practicals)

Component 1: Varieties of film and filmmaking Written examination: 2½ hours 35% of qualification

Section A: Hollywood 1930-1990 (comparative study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two Hollywood films, one from the Classical Hollywood period (1930-1960) and the other from the New Hollywood period (1961-1990).

Section B: American film since 2005 (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two American films, one mainstream film and one contemporary independent film.

Section C: British film since 1995 (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two British films.

Component 2: Global filmmaking perspectives Written examination: 2½ hours 35% of qualification

Section A: Global film (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two global films: one European and one produced outside Europe.

Section B: Documentary film One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one documentary film.

Section C: Film movements – Silent cinema One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one silent film or group of films.

Section D: Film movements – Experimental film (1960-2000) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one film option.

Component 3: Production Non-exam assessment 30% of qualification

This component assesses one production and its evaluative analysis. Learners produce: · either a short film (4-5 minutes) or a screenplay for a short film (1600-1800 words) plus a digitally photographed storyboard of a key section from the screenplay · an evaluative analysis (1600 - 1800 words).

Core or Option

 Option

No Option Choices (GCSE only)

 

No. GCSE / A Level equivalent

 A Level Film Studies